• Why You Shouldn’t Be Confused About All the Hubbub About Hummus

    Pico de gallo salsa

    America has gone through a series of changes in the last ten to fifteen years. Electric cars have become increasingly popular, no one listens to Ricky Martin anymore, the smartphone was invented, and then there’s hummus dip recipes.

    Believe it or not, hummus dips have been around for a long time. Like, a really, really long time. Like 13th-century ancient Egypt long time. In fact, the earliest documented recipe for a hummus recipe dates back to 13th-century Egypt, where chickpeas — the main ingredient in hummus — were grown as a staple food.

    However, although hummus has existed for quite some time and is widely popular in several Mediterranean countries, it wasn’t until roughly ten to fifteen years ago that hummus actually became popular in the states. Prior that time, hummus was confined to health food stores during the 1960’s and 1970’s.

    Hummus is the perfect guilty pleasure in that its rich, creamy, and indulgent texture and exotic flavors make you feel as though you are eating something that is bad for you, when in reality, it’s quite nutritious. Packed with protein, iron, vitamin C, and the antioxidant properties of fresh garlic, hummus is the ultimate not-so-guilty-after-all-pleasure.

    As the home chef and foodie niche continues to expand, more and more home cooks are beginning to create their very own hummus dip recipes. While this may seem intimidating at first, especially for amateur home chefs, creating hummus is surprisingly simple. What a perfect snack!

    Simply start out by creating a mixture of cooked and pureed chickpeas, fresh garlic, lemon juice, and a drizzle of olive oil. That’s it! Some people prefer to use fresh or uncooked chickpeas as opposed to canned, however, this is not necessary. In addition, you can added tahini or a ground sesame seed paste for added flavor. From there, the fun begins and you start adding your toppings. See this reference for more.